Physical Therapy – Vestibular Rehabilitation

The Outpatient Vestibular Rehabilitation Program provides treatment for people with vertigo and vestibular (inner ear) disorders. The vestibular system, in addition to the senses of touch/position and vision, contributes to one’s ability to maintain balance. If there is a problem in the inner ear, the brain cannot rely on information from the vestibular system to assist with balance. The result is dizziness or being off-balance. This can lead to limitations in daily activities, with the avoidance of simple movements such as looking up, bending over, or turning.

The goals of Vestibular Rehabilitation are to reduce or eliminate vertigo and dizziness, improve balance and walking, reduce sensitivity to visual stimulation and motion, and a return to normal activities.

Vestibular Rehabilitation can benefit patients with the following conditions:

  • Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)
  • Neuritis or labyrinthitis
  • Vestibular hypofunction/vestibulopathy (unilateral or bilateral)
  • Chronic Meniere’s disease
  • Pre-/Post-surgical acoustic neuroma (i.e. vestibular schwannoma) resection
  • Ototoxicity
  • Age-related vestibular degeneration
  • Post-concussion syndrome
  • Migraine-associated vertigo
  • Cervicogenic dizziness 

Evaluation and treatment are provided by physical therapists who have achieved competency certification in Vestibular Rehabilitation through Emory University (i.e. Herdman certification). 

The evaluation process may include assessment of eye motions using video Frenzel goggles and assessment on the Balance Master computerized balance system. 

A referral from a physician or approved healthcare provider is required for outpatient physical therapy evaluation and treatment. For information or to set up an evaluation, call Rehabilitation Services - Physical Therapy, Vestibular Rehabilitation Service at 425.251.5165. Referrals may be faxed to 425.656.4028.


Patient Comments


As I walked into the Physical Rehabilitation Center for my appointments with Julie Fulton, she would greet me with a smile. As we would walk back to the workroom, she would ask: "How are you doing today? How are you feeling today?" When we entered the workroom, she would continue, "What is your level of pain? What is your level of dizziness on a scale from 1-10?" She was always on task!

Julie is one who encourages, teaches and shows the levels of durability in therapy with measurable outcomes. I could not have imagined the long-term effects of vestibular dysfunction. I express feelings of thankfulness for my 8 months of work with Julie. I value her skills, passion and professionalism. 

— T.A. (July 2015)



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